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Everyone has habits

We often think of habits as bad things. If you ask someone to name some of their habits, the answers you’ll likely get will be something along the lines of; “I smoke/drink to much”, or “I bite my nails”, or “I like to stay in bed late”, etc. For many people, watching TV is a big habit.

In fact, on average, the typical UK adult watches three hours and twenty-five minutes per day.

One in four adults spend an astonishing 40 hours per week watching TV!

Just imagine how many good 10 minute habits we could have in that time ūüôā

 

How many habits does the average person have?

We all have dozens of habits. In fact, According to research by David T. Neal, Wendy Wood, and Jeffrey M. Quinn of Duke University, approximately 45% of everyday behaviours are actually habits.

They’re a necessary part of our lives. In fact, our entire existence is formed from them. We just don’t think about the good ones.

Eating healthily is a habit, exercising is a habit, being frugal with money is a habit.

That’s one of the main reasons I like to call my habits my routine choices. They’re choices that are part of my everyday routine.

I know it’s only semantics, but language is a powerful tool.

So, if you’re going to have so many of them anyway, why not make sure the ones we hang on to are helpful.

 

How do I change the bad ones into good ones then?

The trick is to firstly identify all the things you already do regularly, then group them as good, neutral, or bad.

old-way-new-way imageJust get yourself a note book and try to catch the things you do regularly. Then, make a note of them and stick them in a group.

Once you know your bad habits, you can replace them, by using that same trigger to fire off a new, better habit.

eg: If your normal routine is to immediately have a glass of wine when you get home from  work, why not change your tipple for one of the many great tasting, non-alcoholic varieties available?

Keeping, or changing a habit is always easier if you use a trigger to remind you. It’s even better if you can use something that already triggers a habit.

Use this technique and you’ll have found a simple way to chuck some of your bad habits and replace them with some good ones.

Do you have a technique that’s worked well? Share it in the comments, or in the Facebook community.

 

 

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